It’s the simple things that count…

I sometimes think too much about things that are small.  I can spin on quick, seemingly irrelevant interactions with others.  And I suspect I’m not alone.

holding_door2

Like the other day when the person less than 3-feet in front of me, who’d recently passed me, didn’t hold the door.  One of the those heavy doors that snaps back hard when you let go.  You know the kind. 

I get it – this is no big deal – it’s a small thing, but it pissed me off.  Yes, I got over it and in the big scheme of things it’s nothing, but there was an impact, not only to the finger I stubbed, but to my mood.

Small things do matter.  How we interact in the world, with each other, resonates through the world in ways that we don’t understand, recognize, or can see.  If he’d taken an extra five seconds to hold the door for a stranger, that simple act would’ve made a difference.   At best, I’d have received a mood bump.  At worst, I’d have taken his act for granted.  Either way, it would not have given me the opportunity to make a bad choice (yep – no matter what he did, I made the choice to get pissed).

This is one very small, simple interaction.  Think about all the interactions we have every day.  Many of these interactions are much more significant.

Today Words of Balance challenges us to become better people.  The third sentence in the most recent post is:

Take an extra 5 seconds to hold the door for a stranger, sometimes it is the simple things that count.

I know that if the person in front of me would’ve taken the time to do this (and had I made a different choice in reacting) I’d have started my day differently. Interactions with others matter – big or small.  I’ll take the challenge and try to become a better person today. How about you?

Picture from Etiquette Tips, Bring It Back Now!.

8 thoughts on “It’s the simple things that count…

  1. Pingback: Daily Prompt: Third From the Top | MythRider

    1. Chris Post author

      Hi Sheila. It’s true. I find that many of the things we take for granted are more positive than negative, like the presence of a loved one, and we only realize how much we valued them when their gone. I think that attention and awareness truly are the keys to happiness. Thanks for stopping by and commenting!

      Reply
  2. Pingback: Loyal To Albert’s Gall (Short story) | The Jittery Goat

  3. Pingback: Daily Prompt: Third From the Top | My Atheist Blog

  4. lauracroggon

    an inspiring post and i have to agree i hate it when someone was to ask something of me without using ‘please’ or ‘thank you’ a small word makes minor difference to them so it confuses me why someone would choose NOT to use manners! I recently wrote a blog post on conflict resolution, http://conflictwithcroggon.wordpress.com/ it explains theory’s on resolving conflict, but do you think this is enough to instantly remove the emotions a person held before attempting to resolve the conflict they had? Would love to hear your thoughts on the topic and look forward to hearing what you have to say, thanks!

    Reply
    1. Chris Post author

      Hi Laura. Thanks for your visit and comment. It’s nice to receive validation through your comments that small things do indeed matter to others!

      I took a look at your post and will share some more detailed thoughts on your site, but in summary I think that frameworks like this are interesting. I don’t know how useful they are in practice given that most conflict happens quickly and the time to consult the framework isn’t usually available. But they help frame options for consideration and discussion when working through various scenarios, and may potentially influence future actions. Using the example from my post, I took the avoidance path, largely because I didn’t think that it would make a positive difference if I confronted this person, so there was nothing to gain. Though in retrospect, perhaps confronting him would have given him the awareness he was lacking and might have resulted in a different experience for others in the future. Hmmm, maybe the framework is working and I’ll act differently next time! 🙂

      Thanks again for the comment and thought provoking post!

      Reply

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